Jeremy Kirwan-Ward

Revolving around his connection with a coastal existence, Jeremy Kirwan-Ward's paintings evoke the complexities of weather and the endlessness of spectral phenomena. While predominantly determined by colour, outcomes are a result of problem-solving, allowing intuition to ride alongside formal structure.

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Flora Terrace, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 170 x 170cm
Flora Terrace, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 170 x 170cm | Jeremy Kirwan-Ward

Jeremy Kirwan-Ward was born in 1949 in Midland, Western Australia. He completed his Associateship in Fine Art at the Western Australian Institute of Technology (now Curtin University) in 1971. Jeremy’s first exhibition was with Giles Hohnen at Skinner Gallery in Perth and he has since maintained a regular exhibiting practice in Australia and overseas.

Jeremy’s work revolves around his connection with a coastal existence - paintings that that evoke the complexities of weather and the endlessness of spectral phenomena. While predominantly determined by colour, outcomes are a result of problem-solving, allowing intuition to ride alongside formal structure. He has worked across mediums - using printmaking, sculpture and photography across his five-decade long career - however he remains, very much, a painter.

Travel has helped to shape new directions for his painting. In 1989 Jeremy undertook a six-month artist residency at Kanoria Centre for Arts in India, and has been awarded residencies at Artspace, Sydney, Institut fur Alles Mogliche, Germany and Point B, USA.

His work can be found in institutional and corporate collections such as the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Scotland, the Art Gallery of WA, Artbank, The University of Western Australia, Murdoch University, Curtin University, Bankwest, Wesfarmers, Office of the Premier, City of Fremantle, City of Perth, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Janet Holmes à Court Collection and Kerry Stokes Collection

The artist monograph 'Jeremy Kirwan-Ward: You Can See it From Here' was published by Art Collective WA in 2017 and features essays by John Barrett-Lennard and Margaret Moore.